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Folklorists in March

Nancy Nusz (MA, Western Kentucky University) began her folklore career at the Bureau of Florida Folklife, serving as Folk Arts in Education coordinator. She has a Masters in Folklore from Western Kentucky University. In 1991, she came to the Oregon Folklife Program (previously housed at the Oregon Historical Society), first as coordinator & then director. Under her leadership, the OFP staff worked statewide in collaboration with communities, tribes, and educational partners as well as folk artists to produce exhibits, festivals, instructional materials, in-class and after-school programs, community-based documentation projects, and much more. Nusz has also consulted with UNESCO’s division of Intangible Cultural Heritage and will be conducting fieldwork in the Columbia Gorge region this spring.

Deborah Fant (MA, UT Austin) has been a public folklorist for over 20 years, first as a fieldworker for the Bureau of Florida Folklife. Debbie has a Masters in anthropology and folklore from the University of Texas and was the recent recipient of an Archie Green Fellowship from the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress. She has worked as the Idaho state folklorist, Manager of the Cowboy Poetry Gathering (Western Folklife Center), Deputy Director of Northwest Folklife, and now for the Washington State Parks & Recreation Commission. Fant has conducted fieldwork, directed festivals, edited publications, curated exhibits, and is now conducting fieldwork in Oregon’s Columbia Gorge region.

Riki Saltzman(PhD, UT Austin) joined the Oregon Folklife Network as Executive Director in July 2012 after nearly 18 years as the Folklife Coordinator for the Iowa Arts Council/Department of Cultural Affairs. From 1988-92, Riki was a Folklife Coordinator at the Bureau of Folklife and then the Florida Folklife Festival Director. At the OFN, the state’s folk and traditional arts program, Riki works with a variety of communities, Tribes, organizations, and individuals to document, preserve, promote, and celebrate Oregon’s cultural heritage and empower tradition keepers. She has worked as a public folklorist since 1982 and has produced a radio series, exhibits, websites, festivals, and conferences. Saltzman has a PhD in anthropology and folklore from the University of Texas and is the author of a book as well as journal and popular articles. Riki is particularly passionate about local foods, those who harvest or produce them, and their traditions–especially those to do with stories and recipes.


Please join Dr. Loren Kajikawa on Friday, March 13th from 3-4:30pm in Gerlinger Lounge for Hands Up & Breathe: A Conversation About Racial Justice and Hip Hop Culture with Jeff Chang and James Peterson

Hands Up & Breathe: A Conversation About Racial Justice and Hip Hop Culture with Jeff Chang and James Peterson is possible through the generous sponsorship of the Department of English, the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Oregon Humanities Center, the School of Music and Dance, the Center on Diversity and Community, and the Justice, Difference, and Inequality General Education Cluster.

Pineridge Bluegrass Folklore Society

Come One, Come All !!

The Second Folklore Program Welcoming Event

UO offers a major and minor in Folklore, as well as an MA.  You could be closer to a degree than you think! Learn more about the Folklore Program by joining us Thursday, February 26, at 4:00 pm in the Browsing Room at Knight Library.

FREE PIZZA AND REFRESHMENTS

Welcoming Event


tattooJules Helweg-Larsen will deliver the first Folklore Graduate Colloquium address on February 26 at 6:00 pm in the Lorenzo West Room (PLC 461). Titled “Been There, Done That, And Got The Ink To Show For It,” Jules’s talk addresses tattoos as they relate to place through theories of Romantic Nationalism, cognitive mapping, tourism, sympathetic magic, and sense of place.

Graduate Colloquium


 

The Folklore Program at the University of Oregon is proud to announce that Dr. Carol Silverman has been inducted into the Fellows of the American Folklore Society.  Read More

The Folklore Program at the University of Oregon is proud to announce that Dr. Carol Silverman has been inducted into the Fellows of the American Folklore Society.  Click image to Read More.

Dr. Lisa Gilman, Director of the Folklore Program, has been elected to the Executive Board of the American Folklore Society. Click image to Read More.

Dr. Lisa Gilman, Director of the Folklore Program, has been elected to the Executive Board of the American Folklore Society. Click image to Read More.

Studies in Folklore

The Folklore Program at the University of Oregon is one of a few major centers of folkloristic research in the United States. With more than thirty participating faculty, our program provides an interdisciplinary approach to a Masters Degree, allowing students to create a focused course of study in their areas of interest.

The Folklore Program offers perspectives on ethnic, regional, occupational, gender, and other traditional identities of individuals in specific societies. Students study the extent to which tradition continues to enrich and express the dynamics of human behavior throughout the world. Folklore courses examine the historical, cultural, social, and psychological dimensions of such expressive forms as mythology, legend, folktale, music, dance, art, belief, foodways, ritual, and ceremony.

Theoretical analyses, research methods, and fieldwork techniques are integral parts of the program’s curriculum. Graduate courses cover an extensive range of interdisciplinary topics: cultural heritage, ethnicity, subcultures, popular culture, performance, gender, film, religion, community arts administration, local culture, and issues of diversity and globalization.

Folklore graduates work in various public and private agencies as educators, archivists, editors, arts and humanities consultants, museum curators, festival planners, and more.

Read an article about the Folklore major.

In addition to the undergraduate major and minor in Folklore, the UO’s Folklore Program has introduced two new tracks to its existing graduate Master’s degree program. The General Folklore Track offers students a strong foundation in Folklore Studies while also allowing them to take elective courses in their areas of focus, such as anthropology, arts and administration, English, comparative literature, and music. The Public Folklore Track prepares students who plan to work in the public sphere by building professional skills such as ethnographic research, documentation, grant writing, administration, and programming. For more information about graduate studies in Folklore at the University of Oregon, please visit our: Graduate Studies page.


The American Folklore Society (AFS) is the national professional academic organization for the discipline of Folklore.  For information about the AFS and to learn how to become a member, use this link.