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The Folklore Program at the University of Oregon is one of a few major centers of folkloristic research in the United States. With more than thirty participating faculty, our program provides an interdisciplinary approach to a Masters Degree, allowing students to create a focused course of study in their areas of interest.


Remembering Dr. Edwin Coleman

Dr. Edwin Coleman, longtime Folklore and English faculty, civil rights activist, and noted musician, passed recently. Ed is remembered by faculty and former students with great affection. His impact on the Folklore Program, the Department of English, and the University of Oregon, is substantial.

According to Dr. Carol Silverman, “Ed Coleman was a major part of the Folklore program for decades. His dedication to the arts, to diversity, to social justice and to student support was boundless. He fearlessly stood up for his beliefs. As one of the only African-American professors, he was a

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Dr. Gantt Gurley Book Publishing Celebration

Please join the UO Folklore Program’s Dr. Gantt Gurley in  celebration of the publication of his new book “Meïr Aaron Goldschmidt and the Poetics of Jewish Fiction.”  The celebration is scheduled for Wednesday, February 22,  3-5 pm, in the Graduate School Lounge in Susan Campbell Hall on the UO campus.

Gantt Gurley received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2007. Before coming to Oregon he lectured at the University of California’s Scandinavian Department and was a Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard

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Folklore Professor Daniel Wojcik’s new book gets inside the world of outsider art

On January 3, UO English professor and folklorist Daniel Wojcik was featured in an article in AroundtheO that highlights his latest book, “Outsider Art: Visionary Worlds and Trauma”. Wojcik examines and challenges the genre of “outsider art” and inserts his unique academic perspective into a conversation that’s been dominated by the art collectors, critics and dealers who drive demand for these pieces. His research attempts to humanize a group of artists he says are frequently marginalized and disempowered. Read the entire article here.

 



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